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Tremella encephala to Xylaria polymorpha
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Tremella encephala 1
Tremella encephala "Pine-tree Brain Jelly" (my name) (Gk: encephalo- = brain) is a wood-rotting jelly fungus that grows world-wide on dead wood, especially pine. It is known to parasitize other fungi growing on the wood, particularly Stereum species. Fruit bodies variable, 15-25 mm, iregularly folded and rounded, jelly-like, translucent, creamy-pinky-brown coloured. The cushion-shaped mass has a hard central core (see 2nd ref).  ANBG ref  ANBG cut sections Mason's Falls, Kinglake National Park, 2007.  65 kB 
Tremella encephala 2
Tremella encephala - see previous. Mason's Falls, Kinglake National Park, 2007.  48 kB 
Tremella fimbriata 1
Tremella fimbriata, "Brown Witch's Butter" is an uncommon wood-rotting jelly fungus that grows world-wide on dead wood.(Some name confusion; also called T. foliacea and T. frondosa.) It parasitizes other fungi on the wood, especially Stereum species. Fruit bodies very irregularly lobed, to 100 mm wide by 60 mm high, very glossy, gelatinous, dark reddish-brown shades, drying black-brown. Spore print white to pale cream. Edible, eaten in China.  Mushroom Expert ref  Mykoweb ref (both as T. folicea) Doctor's Creek walking track, Reefton, 2005.  52 kB 
Tremella fimbriata 2
Tremella fimbriata - see previous. Note proximity to the extensive white mycelium of a different fungus. Doctor's Creek walking track, Reefton, 2005.  53 kB 
Tremella fimbriata 3
Tremella fimbriata - see previous. Doctor's Creek walking track, Reefton, 2005.  53 kB 
Tremella fimbriata 4
Tremella fimbriata - see previous. Doctor's Creek walking track, Reefton, 2005.  59 kB 
Tremella fimbriata 5
Tremella fimbriata - see previous. Doctor's Creek walking track, Reefton, 2008.  50 kB 
Tremella fuciformis 1
Tremella fuciformis, "White Jelly Fungus", "Snow Fungus", "Siver Tree-ear Fungus" is widespread and common world-wide, early in the wood-rotting cycle, growing parasitically on (or at least in association with) existing wood-rotting crust fungi such as Hypoxylon spp. and Stereum spp. Fruit bodies up to 160 mm long, to 60 mm high, very complexly lobed and folded, colourless to off-white, translucent to opaque; forms colonies; dries to a creamy-yellow shrunken mass, reconstituting in water. Eaten in Asia in various sweet dishes.   Tom Volk's ref  ABRS ref Myrtle Loop Walk, The Beeches, Marysville, 2007.  50 kB 
Tremella fuciformis 2
Tremella fuciformis - see previous. Ned's Gully, Cathedral Range, 2007.  37 kB 
Tremella fuciformis 3
Tremella fuciformis - see previous. Myrtle Loop Walk, The Beeches, Marysville, 2007.  34 kB 
Tremella fuciformis 4
Tremella fuciformis - see previous. Ned's Gully, Cathedral Range, 2007.  35 kB 
Tremella fuciformis 5
Tremella fuciformis - see previous. Ned's Gully, Cathedral Range, 2007.  34 kB 
Tremella fuciformis 6
Tremella fuciformis - see previous. Myrtle Loop Walk, The Beeches, Marysville, 2007.  40 kB 
Tremella fuciformis 7
Tremella fuciformis - see previous. Ned's Gully, Cathedral Range, 2007.  56 kB 
Tremella mesenterica 1
Tremella mesenterica, "Yellow Brain Fungus", "Witch's Butter" is a common jelly fungus found world-wide as a parasite on wood-rotting fungi such as Stereum spp. Fruit bodies very variable in size and are often solitary, but does form colonies. Up to 100 mm long and 60 mm high, heavily lobed and folded, gelatinous to firm, semitranslucent deep orange to paler yellow-orange with age. Spore print white. Not regarded as edible.   Tom Volk's ref  NB: T. mesenterica is best viewed as one of a group of orange jelly fungi, distinguishable only microscopically. (One of these is Tremella aurantia, found in Australia only in WA, according to Bougher and Syme.) Read more on this issue in Mushroom Expert and MycoKey. Grampians, 2002.  18 kB 
Tricholoma aff terreum group 1
Tricholoma aff terreum group, this sample is similar (aff = affinity with) to the northern hemisphere fungus called the "Grey Knight", or the "Dirty Tricholoma". Part of a complex of grey Tricholomas on the forest floor. Cap 4-7 cm, dirty grey, with fine grey scales, broadly conical to planar-convex. Gills widely spaced, off-white, unattached to stem; spore print white. Stem off-white, no ring. Mild odour; regarded as edible in northern hemisphere, although diffcult to distinguish from other Tricholoma species. Probably introduced, with a mycorrhizal relationship with pine trees.  Wikipedia ref  Mushroom Expert ref  Rogers Mushrooms ref Blackwood, 2010, under pines.
Tricholoma aff terreum group 2
Tricholoma aff terreum group, see previous. Blackwood, 2010
Tricholoma eucalypticum 1
Tricholoma eucalypticum (?), a native Australian Tricholoma, mycorrhizal with gum trees, has a tannish, viscous cap, 3-6 cm diameter, planar-convex, lobed margin. The flesh tastes bitter, the odour farinaceous at first but becoming putrescent. Gills slightly decurrent, white, spore print white. Stem white, no ring. Blackwood, 2010.
Tricholomopsis rutilans 1
Tricholomopsis rutilans, "Plums and Custard" is a spectacular wood-rotting fungus probably accidentally introduced on conifers from the Northern Hemisphere. (NB: Tricholomopsis = looks like a 'Tricholoma'; Latin: rutilus = red.) Most often found on dead conifer wood, it grows in small groups directly on wood. Cap to 150 mm, convex at button stage, then broadly convex to flat, often undulating and with a shallow umbo; deep yellow but covered thickly with tufts and scales of purplish-red fibrils. Gills pale yellow to yellow, moderately close; spore print white (as in Tricholomas). Stems sturdy, yellow, covered with a layer of purplish-red fibrils; ring absent.  Wikipedia ref  MykoWeb ref  Mushroom Expert ref Baldry Crossing, Green's Bush, 2006.  44 kB 
Tricholomopsis rutilans 2
Tricholomopsis rutilans - see previous. Baldry Crossing, Green's Bush, 2006.  34 kB 
Tubaria rufofulva 1
Tubaria rufofulva is a wood-rotting fungus found only in Australia and NZ, always on dead wood, scattered or, rarely, bunched (i.e. caespitose). Cap 45 mm, wine-red to maroon, conical to convex, later flattening or even upturned, with central umbo; margin incurved at first; surface smooth, dry, slightly velvety-fibrillose or minutely scaly. Hygrophanous: cap dries out to paler colour. Gills close, same colour as cap, becoming brown as spores mature; spore print bright rust-brown. Stem average, same colour as cap, perhaps lighter near apex above ring; tough, scaly, and may be twisted; has a pale, flimsy, membraneous or fibrillose ring; white mycelium often visible at base.   Steve Axford ref Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, 2009.  49 kB 
http://steveaxford.smugmug.com/Living-things/Fungi-the-recyclers/Gilled-fungi/Other-gilled-fungi/i-dwRX3C2
Tubaria rufofulva 2
Tubaria rufofulva - see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, 2007.  61 kB 
Tubaria rufofulva 3
Tubaria rufofulva - see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, 2009.  50 kB 
Tubaria rufofulva 4
Tubaria rufofulva - see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, 2009.  32 kB 
Tubaria rufofulva 5
Tubaria rufofulva - see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, 2007.  60 kB 
Tubaria rufofulva 6
Tubaria rufofulva - see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, 2007.
Tulostoma sp Fuhrer 353 1
Tulostoma sp Fuhrer 353   Mediocre specimen. Fruit body 5-20 mm high, consisting of a light buff coloured globose peridium, holding the spores, mounted on a darker coloured stalk with a rough surface. The peridium has an upper conical aperture for spore release. Most common in sandy, arid sites. Species rather difficult to separate in the field. Coranderrk Bushland, Healesville, 2010.
Xeromphalina leonina 1
Xeromphalina leonina, a wood-rotting species I suspect is native to Australia-NZ. Forms dense, orange colonies on rotting wood. Cap to 10 mm, hemispherical when young, opening to plano-convex, then dimpled (umbilicate); orange in colour, shading orange-brown to yellow-orange. Flesh leathery. Gills strongly decurrent (down the stem), widely spaced, thick, often forked near cap margin; spore print white. Stem to 15 mm ,1mm wide, tapering down to base, becoming reddish-brown. Coranderrk Bushland, Healesville, 2010.
Xeromphalina leonina 2
Xeromphalina leonina, see previous. Coranderrk Bushland, Healesville, 2010.
Xeromphalina leonina 3
Xeromphalina leonina, see previous. Coranderrk Bushland, Healesville, 2010.
Xeromphalina leonina 4
Xeromphalina leonina, see previous. Coranderrk Bushland, Healesville, 2010.
Xerula australis 1
Xerula australis "Rooting Shank"is a common, very elegant, cellulose-rotting fungus usually in groups on leaf litter or above buried wood or dead roots. Previously called Oudemansiella radicata var. australis, it belongs to a confused group of 9 related species separable only microscopically. Cap to 80 mm, broadly convex (margin incurved) to flat when mature, smooth, sticky when moist, radially wrinkled when dry or old; colour brown, grey-brown to olive-brown. Gills almost distant, white, spore print white. Stem long (to 200 mm), slender (to 10 mm), brittle (snaps easily), smooth to hairy, white at apex, brown-grey at base; ring absent; extends into ground like a root (rhizomorph) (hence previous name radicata Latin: radix = root).  Wikipedia ref  Austr. Fungi Blog ref   Devilbend Reservoir, Mornington Peninsula, 2008.
Xerula australis 2
Xerula australis - see previous. Young specimen. Devilbend Reservoir, Mornington Peninsula, 2008.  52 kB 
Xerula australis 3
Xerula australis - see previous. Note the existence of a root-like rhizomorph. Ned's Gully, Cathedral Range, 2005.  38 kB 
Xerula australis 4
Xerula australis - see previous. Jack Cann Reserve, Blackwood, 2008.  92 kB 
Xerula australis 5
Xerula australis - see previous. Domestic lawn, Melbourne, 2007.  44 kB 
Xerula australis 6
Xerula australis - see previous. Eco Tourism track, Sanatorium Picnic Ground, Mt Macedon, 2009.  57 kB 
Xerula australis 7
Xerula australis - see previous. Doctor's Creek walking track, Reefton, 2008.  51 kB 
Xylaria aff filiformis 1
Xylaria aff filiformis (?), "Wiry Xylaria" (my name). (NB: aff = affinity with = looks like) Probably world-wide ascomycete growing on rotting leaf litter in wet forest. Fruiting body in form of a slightly hairy, black, wiry stem to 3-15 mm high, 1-2 mm diameter. Widens out slightly at top to a slim, greyish-white spore-producing zone 1-3 cm long, often rounding off as a slightly widened club. This colony has been found in the one spot 3 years in a row.  Mushroom Observer ref  Journal d'un naturaliste ref Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, July, 2010.
Xylaria aff filiformis 2
Xylaria aff filiformis, see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, July, 2010.
Xylaria aff filiformis 3
Xylaria aff filiformis, see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, July, 2010.
Xylaria aff filiformis 4
Xylaria aff filiformis, see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, July, 2010.
Xylaria aff filiformis 5
Xylaria aff filiformis, see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, July, 2010.
Xylaria hypoxylon 1
Xylaria hypoxylon, "Candlesnuff Fungus" is probably one of a world-wide group of wood-rotting ascomycetes that look similar. They apparently occur later in the wood-rotting cycle of fungi, and are common on dead wood in moist forests. Fruit bodies to 80 mm high, hairy, roughly cylindrical, club-shaped or flattened, frequently branched. They produce two kinds of spores. The white tips consist of masses of asexual spores (conidia). As the fruiting body matures, it thickens, becomes all black, and sexual (ascospores) are produced in embedded receptacles called perithecia. The latter form tiny pores on the surface of the fruiting body. Ascospore spore print black.  Wikipedia ref  MykoWeb ref  Rogers Mushrooms ref  Oakes ref Hopetoun Falls, Otway Ranges, 2008.  43 kB 
Xylaria hypoxylon 2
Xylaria hypoxylon - see previous. Hopetoun Falls, Otway Ranges, 2008.  44 kB 
Xylaria polymorpha 1
Xylaria polymorpha, "Dead Man's Fingers" is a common world-wide wood-rotting ascomycete. It is commonly found singly or in clusters on well-rotted wood with the bark fallen off, and involves a related group of Xylaria spp. distinguishable only microscopically. NB: J. Hubregtse (private communication) suggests that in Australia the species has usually been misidentified as X. polymorpha, a Northern Hemisphere species, but is actually the species Xylaria castorea, which has very different spores. Fruiting bodies to 80 mm high, irregularly cylindrical to club-shaped, often grooved or flattened, with a small black, rough stem. The dull black clubs are covered with fine pimple-like ostioles, small apertures from which the black ascospores are issued from small fertile cavities called perithecia; surprisingly, the tough flesh is white inside; spore print blackish-brown. There is a different stage wherein asexual spores called conidia are produced, and the surface is then white to bluish.  Tom Volk's ref  Wikipedia ref  Mushroom Expert ref  Rogers Mushrooms ref Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, 2007.  33 kB 
Xylaria polymorpha 2
Xylaria polymorpha - see previous. Mortimer Picnic Ground, Bunyip State Forest, 2007.  56 kB 
Xylaria polymorpha 3
Xylaria polymorpha - see previous. Myrtle Loop Walk, The Beeches, Marysville, 2005.  52 kB 

 
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